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RESEARCH OVERVIEW

We are interested in the cancer microenvironment or tumour stroma which consists of various cell types, including immune cells and blood vessels, and supports cancer growth. Our research program aims to understand how stromal cells are remodelled, and the extent to which stromal networks regulate cancer progression. We have shown that the tumour microenvironment is highly dynamic and can be re-programmed or remodelled to enhance immune cell uptake and overall response to immunotherapy. Furthermore, we have developed precision tools to specifically target abnormal stromal features to disrupt and re-program signalling networks between multiple stromal components and to break the vicious cycle of disease progression and relapse.

Utilising a suite of preclinical cancer models which includes genetically modified mouse models of pancreatic cancers, orthotopic cancer models of breast, lung, brain and melanoma, and human cancer specimens our goal is to develop new drugs that can increase the survival rate and quality of life of cancer patients.

Professor Ruth Ganss

Professor Ruth Ganss

Cancer Microenvironment

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LATEST NEWS

1000 walkers raise over $1.45m for women’s cancer research

Taking steps to reduce the devastating impact of cancer on women. Fast Facts On average 69,000 new cases of cancer are diagnosed in Australian women each year. One in two women will be diagnosed with cancer by age 85 20,428 Australian women were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2022 3,178…

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image shows ovarian cancer cells from various patients in various colours to show tumour elements

“Google map” of ovarian tumours reveals cancer cells control who gets into their neighbourhood

Perth researchers find some ovarian cancer cells appear to tell immune system to stay away. “Spatial transcriptomics reveals discrete tumour microenvironments and autocrine loops within ovarian cancer subclones” published in the journal Nature Communications A cross-town collaboration involving researchers from the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, St John of…

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Predicting immunotherapy effectiveness in late-stage liver cancer

Blood test could hold key to identifying who will respond to immunotherapy after researchers discover biomarkers in liver cancer tissue. Liver cancer researchers at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research have discovered a link between a specific immune cell found in some patients with advanced liver cancer and how…

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