Associate Professor Barry Doyle

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Vascular Engineering (Joint Program Head - Cardiovascular Science and Diabetes)

Associate Professor Barry Doyle

Vascular Engineering (Joint Program Head - Cardiovascular Science and Diabetes)

Associate Professor Barry Doyle


Profile

Associate Professor Barry Doyle is currently Joint Program Head of Cardiovascular Science and Diabetes and also Lab Head (Group Leader) of the Vascular Engineering Laboratory (VascLab) at the Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research. He is also Associate Professor in the School of Engineering at UWA and an Honorary Fellow at the British Heart Foundation Centre for Cardiovascular Science at University of Edinburgh.

His qualifications include a BEng (2005) and PhD (2009) both in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Limerick, Ireland. Associate Professor Barry Doyle is a previous recipient of a Marie-Curie Fellowship (2010-12), UWA Research Fellowship (2012-14) and NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (2014-18). He has co-developed and established the Biomedical Engineering teaching programs at UWA and was the inaugural Program Chair from 2018-2021. He is also one of the founding members of the BioZone at UWA.

He is on the Editorial Board of Medical Engineering and Physics; Bioprinting; Journal of Endovascular Therapy; and European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery (2018-2021). He reviews for national and international funding agencies, external Masters and PhD programs, as well as for over 30 different leading journals.

Barry feels lucky to work with an amazing group of engineers, scientists and clinicians, and his team has been awarded over 50 local and international prizes for their work. Most notably, winning the international Mimics Innovation Award three times (2009, 2017, 2018). His team of researchers has been awarded over $11 million in funding as lead or co-lead for the research they do at VascLab.

The VascLab research focusses primarily on cardiovascular health and disease, and his research group uses cutting-edge engineering techniques to better understand disease and improve patient outcomes across a range of cardiovascular areas such as aneurysms, dissection, coronary artery disease, placenta vasculature and retinal vasculature. More recently, Barry’s team is working on new biomaterials and biofabrication techniques to develop novel devices for both cardiovascular disease and musculoskeletal disease.


Research Overview

In 2014, Barry established the Vascular Engineering Laboratory (VascLab) at UWA. VascLab focusses primarily on applying cutting-edge engineering techniques to better understand vascular physiology and treat disease.

A longstanding interest is aortic aneurysms and much of his work has aimed at developing new predictive tools to determine aneurysm rupture risk through computational biomechanics. Computational and experimental methods are applied to many different forms of cardiovascular health and disease, with projects ranging from investigating the haemodynamics within the vasculature of healthy mouse placenta, to the development of thrombus in huge aortic aneurysms.

Selected Publications

1.  Doyle, B.J., A. Callanan, P.E. Burke, P.A. Grace, M.T. Walsh, D.A. Vorp, and T.M. McGloughlin, Vessel Asymmetry as an Additional Diagnostic Tool for the Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms, Journal of Vascular Surgery, 2009;49(2):443-454. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

2.  McGloughlin, T.M. and B.J. Doyle, New Approaches to Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Assessment – Engineering Insights with Clinical Gain, Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, 2010;30:1687-1694. Cover image. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

3. Doyle, B.J., A.J. Cloonan, M.T. Walsh, D.A. Vorp and T.M. McGloughlin, Identification of Rupture Locations in Patient-Specific Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms Using Experimental and Computational Techniques, Journal of Biomechanics, 2010;43(7):1408-1416. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

4.Doyle, B.J., A. Callanan, P.A. Grace and E.G. Kavanagh, On the Influence of Patient-Specific Material Properties in Computational Simulations: A Case Study of a Large Ruptured Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, International Journal of Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering, 2013;29:150-164. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

5. Doyle, B.J., T.M. McGloughlin, K. Miller, J.T. Powell and P.E. Norman, Regions of High Wall Stress Can Predict the Future Location of Rupture of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology, 2014;37:815-18. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

6. OLeary, S.A., E.G. Kavanagh, P.A. Grace, T.M. McGloughlin and B.J. Doyle, The Biaxial Mechanical Behaviour of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Intraluminal Thrombus: Classification of Morphology and the Determination of Layer and Region Specific Properties, Journal of Biomechanics, 2014;47:1430-37. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

7. OLeary, S.A., D.A. Healey, E.G. Kavanagh, M.T. Walsh, T.M. McGloughlin and B.J. Doyle, The Biaxial Biomechanical Behaviour of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Tissue, Annals of BiomedicalEngineering, 2014;43:2440-50. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

8. OLeary, S.A., J.J. Mulvihill, H.E. Barrett, E.G. Kavanagh, M.T. Walsh, T.M. McGloughlin and B.J. Doyle, Determining the Influence of Calcification on the Failure Properties of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Tissue, Journal of the Mechanical Behaviour of Biomedical Materials, 2015;42:154-167. [NCBI PubMed Entry]

9. Joldes, G.R., K. Miller, A. Wittek and B.J. Doyle, A Simple, Effective and Clinically Applicable Method to Compute Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Wall Stress, Journal of the Mechanical Behaviour of Biomedical Materials, 2015, in press. DOI:10.1016/j.jmbbm.2015.07.029 [NCBI PubMed Entry]

10. Doyle, B.J. and P.E. Norman, Computational Biomechanics in Thoracic Aortic Detection: Todays Approaches and Tomorrows Opportunities, Annals of Biomedical Engineering, 2016;44(1):71-83.Cover image. [NBCI PubMed entry]